Educational Theories and Pedagogies Space

Friday, 6 April, 2012 - 09:30 to 11:00
Conference room: 

Can emergent learning technologies support the transformation of medical ‘training’ into medical education?

Abstract: 
Emergent technologies can impact learning and teaching in medicine, as they are suited very well to recent conceptualisations of how people learn in health care education: i.e. through inquiry based learning, problem or case based reasoning, by engaging in professional communities of practice and finally by developing literacies and skills beyond learning by rote from medical textbooks, or from transmissive large group sessions. Teaching and learning in medicine can be social and informal and in this context employing a set of emergent learning technologies can really help. The presentation will explore the potential impact of such technologies in moving towards more student-centred pedagogies in medical curricula.
Share/Save

Emerging Learning in Multi-lingual Environments

Abstract: 
In a complex and dynamic environment learning and knowledge are cornerstones of a person’s development. Individuals follow a reflective and dialectic cycle of interactions with knowledge resources and community members towards enriching knowledge and thus achieving learning. Moreover, knowledge resources and community members should be limited by a language barrier. Building upon these arguments, this talk argues for an organic, bottom-up approach embracing the inherent social aspects of learning and knowledge creation. MORMED is described as an environment nurturing the formation of emergent learning whilst transcending the language barrier, and is applied in the area of Lupus disease. In this talk I will explain how MORMED is creating the infrastructure that facilitates the emergent learning between members of Lupus disease community.
Share/Save

Dynamic Learning Maps, an overview and demonstration of an unique curriculum delivery system

Abstract: 
In this session we will demonstrate an unique approach to curriculum delivery via dynamic personalised learning maps. The Dynamic Learning Maps (https://learning-maps.ncl.ac.uk/) or DLM system is now in use in the first four years of the MBBS curriculum at Newcastle University, and is currently being rolled out for a Pharmacy programme at the University of Bradford. The system has interest from other UK based undergraduate courses. DLM are a fusion of formal curriculum maps, personal learning records, and community-driven maps. Using established technologies and standards the maps provide 'mash-ups' of information from curriculum databases, ePortfolios and other sources. The DLM approach enhances understanding and navigation of the curriculum and provides a means for students to actively map, contextualise, reflect on, and evidence their learning. We will go on to describe some exciting planned extensions, which have recently received funding to facilitate collaboration, including support for sharing, rating and discussion of learning resources linked to specific topics in the maps. Drawing on the work of other experts, RIDLR will investigate harvesting OERs from the Learning Registry (http://www.learningregistry.org/) UK node (The JLeRN Experiment, see http://jlernexperiment.wordpress.com/), presenting them in the context of curriculum and personal learning maps, utilizing and sharing back 'paradata', whilst SupOERGlue is looking at how OERGlue (http://www.oerglue.com/), a novel easy to use content aggregation tool, can be integrated with Dynamic Learning Maps to enable teachers and learners to generate custom content from within personalised views of the curriculum, by aggregating and sequencing their own OER related to specific topics, with automatic rich contextualization, presented dynamically in situated learning events. The session will involve remote online demonstration of the system from Dr Tony McDonald, who will describe the technical approaches and technologies. Suzanne Hardy will go on to explain the planned extensions, and lead a discussion on the approaches taken.
Share/Save

Facilitating the design and enactment of Moodle based medical training activities using the CADMOS tool

Abstract: 
CADMOS is a graphical design tool that has been created in order to be used by novice learning designers, i.e. practitioners/teachers with basic computer skills and knowledge of learning standards, for specifying and orchestrating the activities of a learning script. Its innovative feature is that it enables a learning designer to enact a learning script in the Moodle learning platform . This paper will show an example from medical education sector how CADMOS can aid in bridging the gap between the design and the enactment of a learning script without the need of any technical knowledge about the Moodle platform.
Share/Save

Educemiology: the “Epidemiology” of Medical Learning Resources

Abstract: 
It is often claimed that Medical Education is much benefited from technological progress. Recent advances in the social web sphere have highlighted the importance of openness, enabled social collaboration, improved participation, allowed for the emergence of social networking and intelligence and have pinpointed key new terms like “Apomediation” and “disintermediation”. All these have started playing key roles in educational processes, and have inevitably shifted focus from educators to educational resources and education material that may be shared by online communities of learning through various open educational repositories. Moreover, recent advances in the semantic web front, have shed light and emphasis on the notion of linked data, which basically concerns the publishing of structured data so that it can be interlinked more effectively and hopefully become more useful. This has shifted focus from serving web pages for human readers into sharing information in a way that can be read automatically and “understood” by machines. Inevitably this enables data from different sources to be connected in a better way and be queried more effectively and efficiently. In this paper emphasis is placed on the fusion of the above advances and how these have been approached in mEducator (www.mEducator.net) in order to organise, repurpose, re-use and share medical educational resources, by capitialising novel approaches in both semantic and social web dimensions. We will demonstrate how mash-up tools can create geographical maps of learning resources, thereby representing in a novel (but still familiar way) way connections that are inherited among learning materials and relationships built in the environment amongst the educators and the students as well. This potentially creates a new term which we coin in here, that is, “educemiolody”. In an analogous way of defining epidemiology as “the study of the distribution and patterns of health-events, health-characteristics and their causes or influences in well-defined populations”, educemiology stands for the creation and study of “epidemiological” maps, displaying how medical learning resources from one Institution or academic teacher or expert are distributed to other places and connected to other resources and people, so as to be used in other educational contexts. It is hoped and envisaged that this will become the cornerstone method of health education research, and help inform policy decisions for shaping new guidelines and standards for medical academic staff development, promotion and upgrades. Moreover, educemiology may be utilised to identify benefits for departmental portfolio implementations, that be targeting in turn towards institutional quality assurance and external audit procedures.
Share/Save
Share/Save