The Health Portals & Communities of Practice

Saturday, 7 April, 2012 - 14:00 to 15:30
Conference room: 

MEDTING Medical Images and Cases Exchange Portal

Abstract: 
MedicalExchange Medting Ltd offers a family of web products for eHealth, from collaboration platforms to medical viewers. They are devoted to improve health solutions and medical collaboration and knowledge sharing using cutting edge web 2.0 technologies. Medical Exchange MEDTING is a web 2.0 platform which allows you to create a teaching and academic repository directly from clinical daily activity, enhance e·learning by integrating multimedia content into your learning experience, connect doctors, residents and students into a social web platform, share cases to obtain second opinions and receive cases to review (Telemedicine), and many other features.
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Organs donation and transplantation in the Web: a study on ‘sentiment’ and ‘web reputation’

Abstract: 
The paper presents the results of a/preliminary study on ‘web reputation’ of organs donation and transplantation for the development of an institutional approach to structured mashup viral information in the Web, as part of a national campaign in May 2012 on organs donation. The project is developed by the Italian Ministry of Health and the Italian National Centre for Transplantation (CNT) in collaboration with the R&D e-content Centre of the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, CReSEC ( www.cresec.it). The study has dealt with the so called “web reputation” and “sentiment” on donation and transplantation in Internet: i. web analysis of statistical diffusion of search strings, through Google Trends, dealing with donation, transplantation, organs, tissues, cells donation and transplantation etc. in Italy and in the English and French speaking worlds; ii. a qualitative analysis of Facebook and Twitter pages through posts and tweets; iii. the collection, classification and analysis of You tube and Flickr multimedia materials through a qualitative metrics based on people, information, institutions and attitudes toward the topics; iv. the collection, classification and analysis of samples of sites as regards quality stress on people, information, emotional attitudes and related linguistic styles. Results signal out the wider impact of the ‘transplantation’ related key words as compared with ‘donation’ on the basis of semantic considerations; problems of omography in digitisation of key words and a diverse diffusion of search interests in Italy and in English/French speaking territories. Specific positive and negative attitudes in websites, (the existence of the ‘predatory’ approach in sites and mismatching information ); the use of a polar linguistic attitude ( either institutional technical information or emotional, lack of a “friendly” scientific informative style ); minor attention to persons in favour of institutions and information. Transversal correlation as regards the commercial trends of organs “donation”.
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Patients and Doctors in Web 2.0 and Social Media

Abstract: 
Background: The broadband and mobile internet access and the widespread use of web 2.0 services and social media have a strong impact on how medicine is practiced, how patients obtain health and healthcare information. The newly acquired skill of patients to access the same sources of medical information as health care professionals brought on notable changes in the traditional doctor-patient relationship. Both doctors and patients, however, do not feel confident yet about the changes that internet and social media have brought. Patients often feel uneasy to disclose to physicians their personal research on the internet and/or their connecting with other patients with similar diseases to exchange information on symptoms, medicines, health care providers. Physicians on the other hand, are uncomfortable with patients who seem to have researched their symptoms or disease and ask questions. Doctors do not offer to patients additional information about diseases, their options for medicines or treatment, and do not indicate reliable information sources on the internet. They are thus, missing opportunities for patient education and building trust in their relationship with patients. Objective: The use of web 2.0 services and social media by physicians and patients varies considerably among regions. In the USA and Northern Europe, it has grown considerably, while in Southern, Central and Eastern Europe it just emerges. The different models of medicine practice in Europe and Anglo-Saxon regions reflect in the use of internet and social media. In many European countries the paternalistic model of medicine practice prevails and is accepted by both healthcare professionals and patients. This study’s objective is to show that web2.0 and social media can be valuable learning, networking and communication tools, using case studies of physicians successfully including web 2.0 services and social media in their medical practice and of expert patients, known as e-patients, who educate themselves, connect with other patients, and improve their health outcomes. Examples of health care providers and patients from Europe including Greece will show how their use of web2.0 and social media differs from that of their peers. Method: As an internet user for health and healthcare information, since the early 90s, an online patient communities’ member and social media active user, the observational method is used. My observations stem from participation in several online social media platforms and tools, online and off-line contacts with Greek, European, and US physicians, patients and members of patient organizations, as well as information from regional and international medicine and patient advocacy conferences, which I attended as speaker or participant. In my observations, I have kept note of findings of published research on health/healthcare use of web2.0 and social media, the social impact of internet on health, mobile health and observed how these apply to doctors and patients in my country and those I come in contact with from other countries. Results: Undoubtedly, American doctors and patients use more broadly and in a more elaborate, sophisticated way the internet and social media, but also in the USA, there are still regions, where the physician remains the basic, if not the ultimate source of information for patients, and also where patients are reluctant to use web2.0 and social media. European doctors and patients have only recently started to use web2.0 and social media, but differently than their American counterparts. Europeans are more conservative in sharing health concerns publicly online or in communicating with other health professionals on medical issues, but once they experience the benefits of crowd-sourcing, usually, they become adepts. In Greece, the physicians on web2.0 and social media are still few and their majority is perplexed about how they can use them. They do not use it for engaging with patients or with peers in medical and/or healthcare topics, but mostly socially about politics, news, chatting with friends, sharing music, photos and videos. Few consider them as modern medical marketing tools. The number of Greek patients on web2.0 and the social media is growing although it is still small. Few Greek patients share their health concerns online, advocate for better healthcare or to promote their cause. Greek patients and doctors use both Greek and English language in social media and connect with other Greeks and foreigners. Conclusions: The web2.0 and social media adoption by physicians and patients varies considerably among countries and different socio-economic demographics, but adoption rates of the last three years show wider spread. The majority of adopters is found in oncology, diabetes, mental and neurological diseases. Southern, Central and Eastern Europe are among the late adopters. Physicians and patients venturing on web 2.0 and social media often use as models power users in their specialty or disease. Web2.0 and social media offer many benefits to physicians and patients, if used with care. They are just tools, and as tools, if the user knows their possibilities and uses them sensibly, he will find out that they are valuable knowledge and engagement means
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From teaching to Development in Competency for Communities of Practice

Abstract: 
Background: For years medical staff in the Capital Region of Denmark has received teaching in new IT systems in class-rooms away from their workplaces. The method of teaching was based on Herskin and one of his educational tools include hands-on learning in the classroom. Today hospitals face lack of resources to support this and it opens for an increasing need for learning within communities of practice. The following method has been tested at one hospital with 3000 clinicians and is intended to be used at eleven hospitals with app. 40.000 clinicians. Objective: Nurses in hospital-units have to use new IT systems to document the care. They are introduced to a new competence-development-concept, where key people play a role as changing agents in implementing IT systems and they are involved and responsible for receiving the IT system. They learn how to use it by watching informative educational films with close transfer and by practical use supported by a consultant from the IT unit. Hereafter they then initiate and support the competency development of colleagues. Method: The competence-development-concept is developed to be used implementing small IT systems and subsequent involves changes in the way of documenting the core of nursing. Core knowledge and information about the IT system are communicated via informative films. Results: By using informative films more exact knowledge is disseminated. The central role key people plays guarantees effectiveness and is of vital importance in the implementation. By affording collegial support expert knowledge are attained and remain in the unit long after implementation. More over key people in their responsibility for qualifying future workflow management also results in additional work development. Conclusions: Competency is developed and knowledge is preserved when methods such as films are used in practice and when key people are involved and responsible in implementing IT systems.
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Using medical imaging and semantic web technologies to support educational activities for Multiple Sclerosis Disease

Abstract: 
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic demyelinating disease affecting the Central Nervous System of young adults in the Western World. It has a variable course usually leading to severe deficits both functional and cognitive. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the imaging method of choice. To enhance its diagnostic role, certain imaging criteria, such as the Barkhof criteria, have been established. The advances in web technologies allow the development of e-learning tools that are able to enhance radiologists diagnostic skills by presenting similar clinical cases based on a set of semantic criteria. In this work, an e-learning tool, namely the Semantic Medical Annotation tool (SEMIA), that can support educational activities in MS field is presented. The proposed approach can support two educational scenarios: a) teach radiology residents in identifying MS lesions by retrieving and presenting similar, according to specific criteria, cases from a MS semantic image repository and, b) develop self assessments and tests that radiology residents can use to enhance their skills in the diagnosis of MS based on the Barkhof criteria. SEMIA is based on state of the art Semantic Web technologies and Medical Image processing methods. The semantic content of the images is annotated using reference ontologies and terminologies such as FMA and RadLex along with an application ontology that has been developed for MS. This approach benefits from the advantages of semantic over keyword search and also enhances the knowledge interoperability among institutions. In order to model the Barkhof criteria, SWRL rules are used providing better reasoning and knowledge integration. The proposed approach enables medical educational content to be discovered, retrieved, shared and re-used across institutions. The advantages of such an approach could greatly enhance the skills of radiology residents in the diagnosis of MS and at the same time could contribute to the set up of a Federation of semantically annotated educational content that radiologists could access continuously to improve their skills.
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Federating Learning Management Systems by use of mash-ups: the mEducator2.0 Portal

Abstract: 
mEducator 2.0 is a tool to facilitate the communication & sharing between medical universities or health professionals. By using the mash-up technologies, it allows to create, share, repurpose learning resources metadata. The system allows to group the resources, classify them, order them by relevance, popularity, repurposing history... All this features are in a social web system to connect the users easily.
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The BioMedLabS Portal: overall experience and educational prospects

Abstract: 
Background: Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) is a popular healthcare profession in Greece, regardless its rather limited career prospects in the local job market. The undergraduates’ and professionals’ awareness concerning the international scientific developments, progress and alternative even innovative career options is low. On the other hand, the Internet and Social Media have become popular means for collecting information as well as networking and collaborating. Objective: The BioMedLabS portal aims to introduce the international scientific standards, raise interest and inspire, collect and provide general information regarding the profession. Specialists’ experiences are also used as a source of knowledge and information to the Greek audience. Methods: Via learning 2.0 services and peers, Greek MLS undergraduate students and professionals get interconnected with Greek MLS specialists working in Europe, at positions other than the conventional clinical laboratory bench, and get familiarized with professional rights and guidelines worldwide. Data collected through the network of expertise and the audience that was built, was assembled and presented in seminars organized at Papageorgiou Hospital. Results: The portal opened 34 months ago (493,139 pageviews in 487 posts and 20 pages) and had 159,852 Unique Visitors from 117 countries (Greeks: 93.8 %). Its Facebook page and updates are followed by 1705 individuals (Gender: Male 35%; Female 65%. Age:18-24, 20%; 25-34, 37%; 35-44 6.7%). The most viewed topics concern job opportunities (trending topic: 5.2% of total pageviews), scholarships (trending topic: 2.1%), MLS (trending topic: 1.4%), working abroad (trending topic: 1.2%) and education (trending topic: 1%). Conclusions: The BioMedLabS portal has set the foundations for Greek MLS scientists to connect with the rest of the world and it has presented alternative ways of collecting knowledge and achieving continuous professional awareness. Future aims include a series of webinars, along with several questionaires of different nature, and potentially the development of a database in order to promote informal education in MLS in Greece.
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