Web2.0 and Social Media Space

Friday, 6 April, 2012 - 11:50 to 13:10
Conference room: 

Web2.0 and Social Media in Medical Education

Abstract: 
Social media applications will have a transformative effect on the nature of medicine and healthcare in the future, if the rhetoric around their use is to be believed. There is some evidence that the nature of healthcare interactions between doctors and their patients, and other healthcare professionals, is changing. However, it is also suggested by some that medical education is lagging behind in use of social media. This presentation will introduce examples of commonly used social media applications and of the ways in which they are being used to change healthcare and medical education. It is also important that research be undertaken to provide evidence of the real impact of such applications. The presentation will conclude by introducing some questions that might form the basis of the development of a research agenda in this area. The presentation will draw on work being undertaken by members of the IMIA Social Media Working Group in these areas.
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Integrating Education, Research and Human Caring via Web 2.0 for Healthcare Professionals

Abstract: 
Health care professional educators are becoming more aware of the benefits associated with the application of social media tools, such as the popular online platforms, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Wikieducator and Skype for today’s healthcare providers and students. There has been an increase in the number of publications regarding the use of social media tools in professional education, however there is a lack of evidence of the overall benefits provided by these online social platforms and guidelines on how to use the media to improve student learning outcomes. Furthermore, due to the generational gap between senior faculty and today’s millennial learner there may be hesitancy for some healthcare faculty to endeavor the use of social media (Roberts, Newman & Schwartzstein, 2012). Therefore, a current review of the literature and presentation of the integration of the use of social media in professional education will be presented to the audience.
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Online videos for health education

Abstract: 
Online social videos are extremely popular in the context of health social media. For example, YouTube is the third most visit webpage worldwide where millions of user are sharing videos with their peers. Health organizations are also sharing videos on YouTube. According to Ed Benett study (ebennett.org) nearly 600 US Hospitals have published over 60.000 videos online. Many of those videos have a great potential for medical education. This presentation will provide an overview of the current evidence on the use of social videos for medical education including the advantages and challenges. In addition, we will cover latest trends such as 3D and interactive videos.
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An information behaviour framework for informed and involved patients for clinical decisions: the role of Web 2.0 in shared decision-making

Abstract: 
The prevalent in most healthcare settings clinical decision-making pattern is the one with the doctors being the exclusive decision-makers and the patients having an inactive role, excepting the decisions taken for them, because they differ to the physician’s information and knowledge. This fact is well grounded within our socioeconomic ethos and is supported, among others, by a studied information behaviour paradigm. The concept of the Web 2.0 is bringing about changes and drives innovation towards a new patient-doctor relationship for a more shared clinical decision-making pattern. Quite interestingly, recent research indicates that informed patients have better outcomes than patients who are passive recipients of care; while significant cost savings are achieved by reducing unnecessary medical interventions. Shared-decision goes beyond ethical and regulatory matters towards a cooperative process in which physicians and patients act together for improving the quality of diagnosis and treatment, based on patient’s informed preferences. This involves new roles from both parties, a novel “information counselling” model with the corresponding information behaviour change, based on the development of Web 2.0 healthcare services confidence. This paper initially provides an analysis of behaviour changes towards shared-decision making schemes due to the influences of the internet on clinician–patient relationship, through the provision of evidence-based information about options, outcomes and clinical uncertainties. Thereafter, the Wilson’s information behaviour model is employed, explained and expanded in order both parties to share information and decision-making responsibilities. The internet and Web 2.0 in particular through the development of new ways of interactivity have created a shift to a “shared information behaviour”; however, respect and confidence builds within “real world”, and changes usually takes place over time.
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